History

The Question of Government: The Case for Parliament

There is much to be debated when it comes to politics. Although most of the civilized nations in the world today are democratic, not everyone can agree which system of government is best – the congressional system employed by the United States of America, or the Parliamentary system that Britain, Canada and the other Commonwealth nations have adopted. While neither is flawless, the Canadian system is far superior to its counterpart, the American system, because of its better regulations on government operations, more effective allocation of powers to the Prime Minister, and its encouragement of unity within the House of Commons. [Click to read more]

History

Differences in Political Responses to the Great Depression and the Recession of 2008 in Canada

In the early 1900s, many governments believed in the classical theory that the economic system was self-balancing. As a result, when the Great Depression began in 1929, it was expected that the crisis would eventually end by itself and that there was little to be done by the government. Although the Provincial and Municipal governments were already in debt due to the many development projects undertaken during the 1920s, the federal government offered them minimal aid. Bennett’s conservative government also ignored a lot of the struggles that were going on in western Canada, instead focusing their political and diplomatic agendas towards satisfying its largest voter base, which was situated in eastern Canada and was primarily urban. There was a serious imbalance in conditions throughout Canada, with a shocking 2/3 of the rural and prairie farming population dependent on the meagre government assistance they were receiving, compared to the 1/5 of the population that was struggling in other areas of Canada. The government’s initial support for these issues was minimal, costing them valuable years at the onset of the Great Depression. [Click to read more]